Mama, Make Yourself a Quiche

Who knew that making a quiche could be such a big act of self-care?

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spinach quiche can be self-care

These days, I almost always have a quiche in my fridge. It’s a simple way to ensure—amid hectic mornings—that I get to eat breakfast. It’s an act of self-care. Moms need breakfast, too!

My friend Emily started bringing me quiches after my second baby was born. The mornings were often a rough time for me. I’d be up early to feed the baby and before I could start heating water for coffee, I’d hear the pitter patter of my toddler’s feet. Once he was awake, making my own breakfast got displaced by making breakfast for him, packing his lunch, getting him ready and then out the door for school, and a million other little things that families do before they leave the house in the morning. 

Emily’s quiches made a real difference for me as I was negotiating my new life. I’d grab a slice from the fridge and eat it while pumping. If lunch snuck up on me, there was always quiche.

A simple thing—eating meals—had gotten complicated with a new baby. Quiche made it simple. I was nourished. Taking time to eat that quiche was a small, but powerful, act of self-care.

But Emily wasn’t just making me a quiche. Each time she baked, she made two quiches—one for me and one for herself. As a mom of two young kids, with a third on the way, she too would find it hard to get breakfast in. Her answer was quiche. She’d been doing this for a while—making a quiche on Sunday nights so she’d have easy meals for herself for the week. It was something she did as part of her own self-care.

After what seemed like dozens of Emily’s quiches, life started to feel normal again. When Emily had her baby a few months later, I made her some quiches (though not nearly enough to pay her back for all the ones she made me). And I started making myself quiche on a regular basis.

Quiche is really simple to make. The ingredients aren’t expensive. It keeps well and tastes great cold or warmed up. It’s rich, but wholesome, especially if you add spinach or other veggies. It’s flexible and forgiving. It’s a way of making sure I don’t start my days running on empty. 

For me, having a quiche in the fridge is a remarkably simple act of self-care.

So, Mama, make yourself a quiche. Future you will thank you. Keep it simple—a store bought crust and pre-shredded cheese work just fine. Need a recipe? I’ve shared Emily’s below. It’s simple and perfect—so creamy it melts in your mouth. Self-care couldn’t be more delicious.

(Not into quiche? Then find something else to make in advance to eat when life gets busy. Baked oatmeal, pumpkin bread, even oatmeal cookies loaded with nuts and dried fruit can help you stay fed. Point is, take care of yourself, Mama. You are worth it.)


Emily’s Quiche

Ingredients:
6 large eggs, beaten
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
Salt: 1 tsp. Diamond Kosher (1/2 tsp. if using iodized table salt)
Half of a 5 oz. package of baby spinach. No chopping needed!
Any other veggies you want to use up. I’ve had good success with throwing them in raw.
1 1/2 cups shredded cheese. Use any cheese and enough to cover the entire bottom. Exact quantity does not matter.
1 (9-inch) refrigerated pie crust, fitted to a 9-inch glass pie plate

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees with the rack on the lowest possible rung.
Roll out the pie crust and fit into un-greased pie pan.
Layer the shredded cheese first, then put the spinach on top.
Whisk together the eggs, heavy cream, and salt.
Pour the egg mixture on top. Use your spatula to push under any spinach that’s too floaty. (Otherwise, don’t worry about it being super even. It’ll even out as it bakes.)
Bake for 35 to 45 minutes until the egg mixture is set. I almost always need 45 minutes or more. The center should not jiggle when shook and the edges will be starting to brown.
Cool as needed and serve.

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